Michael Jordan: Basically, I was against all white people


michael-jordan-offcourtArguably the best player, who has ever stepped on a basketball court, Michael Jordan considered himself to be a racist, when he was young.

In Roland Lazenby’s, “Michael Jordan: The Life,” Jordan discussed his upbringing and his views on race as an elementary-school student.

E! Online brought up a couple of excerpts from the book, where Jordan recalls a girl at school calling him a “nigger”.

“I threw a soda at her,” he recalled. “It was a very tough year. I was really rebelling. I considered myself a racist at that time. Basically, I was against all white people.”

According to ProBasketballTalk, in another excerpt from the book, Jordan discussed the aftermath of that incident at school.

“The education came from my parents,” Jordan recalled. “You have to be able to say, OK, that happened back then. Now let’s take it from here and see what happens. it would be very easy to hate people for the rest of your life, and some people have done that. You’ve got to deal with what’s happening now and try to make things better.”

Reminding that on April 25, 2014, TMZ Sports released what it said is an April 9, 2014 audio recording of a conversation between LA Clippers owner Donald Sterling and his girlfriend or former girlfriend. Sterling was recorded making racist and outrageous statements in the conversation. An NBA investigation, which included an interview with Sterling, determined the voice to be authentic.

Following the investigation, NBA commissioner Adam Silver banned Sterling for life and fined him $2.5 million after a firestorm of controversy. The move was praised by many former NBA players, including Magic Johnson, Kevin Johnson and Charles Barkley. Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, and Michael Jordan himself.



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